OVID.tv Presents PSYCHOBITCH Review — Love and Dancing

Trigger Warning: Discussion of Suicide.

Two teens, a boy and a girl, are in the pool in their underwear. They start on the launch boards, poised over the edge of the dark water. They launch themselves into the pool, and collide with the water, bubbles frothing out of their noses. Marius, the young man, looks over to see Frida, the young woman, swimming with all her might, and he slows his pace. As they reach the other side of the pool and surface from the reflective darkness into the gloom of the swimming center, Frida shouts at him, ‘You let me win!’ and challenges him again. She says that they have to start under the water this time. He agrees, asking her if she’s changing the rules so she can win, to which she says, “yes, is that a problem?” He answers her, “no, it isn’t”, with a small smile at her bravado.

They both slide back under the pool water, and she looks over at him, eyes wide open. She holds up her hand, counting slowly, 1... 2... 3! But as they turn to push off the wall into the depths, their intimate moment is broken. Little boys in swim trunks, goggles and swim caps dive into the pull streaking back and forth like penguins in arctic water. They surface, both with looks of embarrassed disbelief: they’ve been caught somewhere they shouldn’t be. The swim instructor catches sight of them and tells them to get out! There’s a practice going on.

This is one of many scenes where we feel the fragility of puppy love. The camera clings closely to the expressions of these two actors, helping us to feel their awakening feelings. In this way, Psychobitch invites us to delve back into the demanding, fraught, glorious nature of being a young teenager and trying to figure out falling in love. While Marius is a young man who is trying to do everything right, and succeeding, Frida is an uncontrollable boundary-pusher; Marius has the right friends, Frida makes a scene in every class; Marius clings tightly to his image, and Frida delights in entertaining her reputation as the crazy girl, or the Psychobitch.

OVID.tv's PSYCHOBITCH Dives Us into a Well of Teenage Tears

These two main characters are young, confused and insecure. We travel with them through humiliations, pranks, and beautiful moments of intimacy; the latter of which are often conducted over Instagram messaging. The music is fun, youthful and energetic, making this writer want to get up and dance along with the characters. It supports the overarching mood of sweetness and innocence, of discovery and growth.

Psychobitch is a romantic comedy, but quite an introspective one, in this lover of the genre’s opinion. We are there every step of the way as Frida and Marius get pushed together, against all odds, and slowly discover each other. They’re opposites, their interactions are chaotic, and yet...

This film is for someone who likes a coming-of-age movie that is about breaking from the pack. Expect emotional intensity and this film to be a tear-jerker. You too may find yourself reflecting on how you were at fifteen. Psychobitch reminds us to be ourselves, and to love whom we love loudly and proudly.

Cast:
Jonas Tidemann, Elli Rhiannon Muller Osbourne, Saara Sipila-Kristoffersen Director: Martin Lund
202, 109 Minutes, in Norwegian

 

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Gwen Flatland

About the Author: Gwen Flatland

Gwen is a Colorado native recently relocated to Bozeman, Montana. Their forever life dream has been to be a ‘writer someday’, and most of their notebooks and her notes- app are full of half-baked narratives based on frustrations, imagination, and more often than not crazy dreams. Their favorite things are reading outside, basking in the morning sun, running on a mountain trail, and cuddling her puppy.

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